Westminster bridge poem william wordsworth. Upon Westminster Bridge by William Wordsworth 2019-01-10

Westminster bridge poem william wordsworth Rating: 5,8/10 797 reviews

Upon Westminster Bridge by William Wordsworth

westminster bridge poem william wordsworth

William married Mary Hutchinson on 4th October 1802 and their children were John, Dorothy Dora , Thomas, Catherine and William. Never did sun more beautifully steep In his first splendour, valley, rock, or hill; Ne'er saw I, never felt, a calm so deep! He would have enjoyed the nature many times before. The sky is clear having no dust and no smoke. The theme of the poem is London as it lies asleep in the early morning sun. The quill in his hand has been broken off.

Next

Upon Westminster Bridge by William Wordsworth

westminster bridge poem william wordsworth

It is a grand example of simile. All his poetry was inspired by an absorbing love of nature, written amongst the lakes and mountains where he spent most of his life. The houses are asleep for the members are sleeping. The sun has just come out. He uses punctuation marks in every second line and it gives a smooth yet fast flow to the feel of the poem.


Next

Upon Westminster Bridge by William Wordsworth poem with text

westminster bridge poem william wordsworth

Upon analysis, the poem reveals the Romantic interest in the natural world. Hence, by using personifications, Wordsworth enlivens the city. London, although considerably not natural, has attracted the attentions of several poets, among them Wordsworth. In lines 1 through 8, which together compose a single sentence, the speaker describes what he sees as he stands on Westminster Bridge looking out at the city. The Octave follows the rhyme scheme abba-abba while the sestet keeps to cdcdcd. And what is this splendid sight? He immediately wrote a poem reflecting his personal feelings, perceptions and fascinations. This is a case of paradox.

Next

Upon Westminster Bridge by William Wordsworth

westminster bridge poem william wordsworth

He goes on to describe the way that the river which he personifies glides along at the slow pace it chooses. This poem is a Petrarchan sonnet. The river glideth at his own sweet will: Dear God! London looks beautiful in the splendour of the rising sun. He wants to show how everything in the city is immersed in sunlight. Show how Wordsworth does this in the poem. The quill in his hand has been broken off. In the end, the poet appears to be stunned into complete silence by the beauty of London.


Next

Upon Westminster Bridge by William Wordsworth poem with text

westminster bridge poem william wordsworth

Note the lack of life throughout the poem, aiming towards an almost alien landscape, a familiar icon turned completely unfamiliar due to the way that it is completely silenced. Its primary aim is to help them to acquire proficiency in education and learning. Blessings be with them - and eternal praise, Who gave us nobler loves and nobler cares, The poets - who on earth have made us heirs of truth and pure delight by heavenly lays! This poem is noteworthy in particular because of its location. After a long untiring effort, this blog has been developed for them. A lot of additional information is also incorporated for the advanced learners. It is an example of a metaphor.

Next

Westminster by William Wordsworth

westminster bridge poem william wordsworth

But these man-made marvels have yet to come to life in the early morning. It appears to him to be the loveliest sight. By writing this, Wordsworth makes it a point to tell the audience that London is still worth coming to see and it still is as beautiful as ever. The reason that there is so much suffering in the world is because people still love and care for each other. In the second part of the poem, when he is closer to the city, the stanzas become more and more empathic through the use of exclamation marks, thus forcing a warped emphasis upon the ends of the phrase, and thus changing the flowing nature of the poem, mimicking the bodily excitement that the poet himself must have felt. Wordsworth, being a modern guy, was starting to experiment with the form and to write in a more conversational style. The technique of hyperbole, or exaggerating for effect, is evident in the poem.

Next

Westminster by William Wordsworth

westminster bridge poem william wordsworth

He was deeply disturbed by the ways and acts of people. In this descriptive poem, Wordsworth goes into the finer details of what he sees and what is around him. The city seems to wear a dress of golden sunbeams. Wordsworth's statue was moved to its present postion in 1932 when the original chapel was designated as a war memorial chapel. As in all great poetry, the soundscape is vital and it is clearly written to be read aloud. He wants to show how everything in the city is immersed in sunlight. Efforts have been made to ensure accuracy of the data on this site.

Next

William Wordsworth

westminster bridge poem william wordsworth

The first eight lines praise the beauty of London in the early morning light, as the poet stands on Westminster Bridge admiring the surrounding buildings. The time is so early that all is quiet. The beauty of the morning; silent, bare. Furthermore, note that the repetitive rhyme scheme gives a flowing sense of time — it beats, as the city beats, sluggish and slowly. Never did sun more beautifully steep In his first splendor, valley, rock, or hill; Ne'er saw I, never felt, a calm so deep! Nature and Beauty So what is the takeaway from all this beautiful form and language? The river glideth at his own sweet will: Dear God! Nature is all alive to him. Its course is not obstructed by the movements of boats or ships.

Next

Composed Upon Westminster Bridge, September 3, 1802 Poem by William Wordsworth

westminster bridge poem william wordsworth

Sonnets tend to have 14 lines and a regular rhyme scheme, and this poem follows that pattern, although not strictly. The various landmarks visible from the bridge, including and the , stand before him in all their grandeur in the morning light. Nobody can ignore this unparalleled and splendid sight. So what makes a sonnet Petrarchan? In this case, Wordsworth uses the ninth line to subtly shift the focus from the man-made wonders of the scene before him to the natural wonders at play. Never did sun more beautifully steep In his first splendour, valley, rock, or hill; Ne'er saw I, never felt, a calm so deep! As a result, the city of London is glowing in its radiating beauty.

Next