Of mice and men chapter 2 analysis. Of Mice and Men Chapter 2: Summary & Quotes 2019-02-28

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Of Mice and Men Chapter One Summary and Analysis

of mice and men chapter 2 analysis

Carlson, another worker, comes in and asks Slim about the puppies that his dog had the previous night. Ending our introduction to these two troublesome characters, Curley and his wife, John Steinbeck writes, 'Lennie cried out suddenly--'I don't like this place, George. Next, Curley's wife stops by looking for Curley. Summary The following morning, and reach the bunk house at the farm. There is more than a whiff of sexism in her depiction.


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Of Mice and Men Part 2 Summary & Analysis from LitCharts

of mice and men chapter 2 analysis

Lennie's eyes moved down over her body, and though she didn't seem to be looking at Lennie she bridled a little. Therefore, her sex acquires no power in terms of work and ideas on the ranch. . He's angry that the men didn't arrive yesterday when they were supposed to, so George tells him that the bus driver dropped them off too far away. Soon enough, the boss enters and asks George and Lennie for their work slips.

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SparkNotes: Of Mice and Men: Section 2

of mice and men chapter 2 analysis

To be able to link events to key themes through out the chapter and also how certain colours represent different feelings. George admits that he lied about Lennie being his cousin. The atmosphere of Chapter Two is immediately hostile and uncomfortable: George suspects that his bed is infested, the Boss suspects that George and Lennie are trying to pull a fast one, Candy is miserable and decrepit, Curley is looking for a fight, Curley's wife is vamping around suspiciously. Lennie wonders if he can get a puppy of his own. Candy tells the men a little about the boss and how he mistreats the stable buck when he's angry since the stable buck is African American. Thus Curley comes to represent all petty, embittered men; Crooks stands in for the persecution and the suffering of all African Americans; George is the eternal cynic-with-a-heart-of-gold and Lennie personifies clumsy innocence.

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Of Mice and Men Chapter 2 Quotes Page 2

of mice and men chapter 2 analysis

Although, when the old pair still has experience and skill to bring to the table he can still be used effectively. He often — as in — alternates short natural vignettes with the parallel struggles of humankind. This association becomes especially important as the tension established in this Chapter spills over into crisis in the pages ahead. Slim does not mind giving away a puppy to Candy, and Lennie suggests to George that maybe he could have a puppy to pet as well. This ain't no good place.

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Analysis of chapter 2

of mice and men chapter 2 analysis

He also reminds Lennie to wait for him at the brush if he should get into any trouble, which is the second time we are given the same foreshadowing of Lennie getting into trouble. The theme of prejudice is shown in this chapter because Candy tells George and Lennie about what happened last Christmas, crooks The black man was invited into the bunk house at Christmas and one of the ranchers picked a fight with him for no reason. The Bunkhouse In chapter two, we travel with George Milton and Lennie Small to their new job at the ranch. They face the original challenges of nature — to feed themselves, to fight for their stake. And Steinbeck's novel certainly features men rather than women.


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Analysis of chapter 2

of mice and men chapter 2 analysis

George is sure to warn Lennie to stay away from Curley, who he knows will try to start a fight, but says if Curley punches Lennie, to 'let 'im have it'. She is, after all, stuck with the most loathsome imaginable husband, Curley - who apparently keeps her confined in their house whenever possible, who obnoxiously brags about their sex life exemplified by the grotesque image of the Vaseline-filled glove , and who cannot be good company. Chapter 2 Summary pages 17-37 The second chapter opens in the bunkhouse of the ranch where George and Lennie are seeking farm work. His talents make him one of the most important and respected men on the ranch. They set up camp and George sends Lennie off to look for firewood so that they can heat up some beans. Even though the people on the ranch seem friendly, none of them seem to have close relationships.

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Of Mice and Men Chapter 2 Quotes Page 2

of mice and men chapter 2 analysis

Next to enter is , the widely respected jerkline skinner. Lennie attempts to speak for himself, aping phrases that George has spoken, but sounds completely ridiculous. Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again. Of Mice And Men Chapter 2 Analysis Racism seems to be introduced immediately after George and Lennie arrive. Carlson proposes shooting Candy's crippled dog and replacing it with one of the puppies.

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Of Mice and Men Chapter 2: Summary & Quotes

of mice and men chapter 2 analysis

The woman accused Lennie of attempting to rape her and George and Lennie had to run for their lives out of town. As our main characters talk to Candy, finding out that their new boss is upset they did not come to work the day before like they were supposed to, their boss comes in. This chapter establishes the setting for the majority of the book and the various other characters who will be important to the story. He is tall, has long, black hair combed straight back, wears denim jeans and jacket, and walks with an authoritative air about him, setting him apart as a skilled worker and craftsman. He converses with Lennie and George, and is quietly impressed by their friendship, appreciating the fact that they look out for one another. On the most basic level, hands are crucial to the work of the farm - these men, after all, live by their labor. One should immediately recognize how completely out-of-place Lennie is in this hostile, gloomy environment: he is innocent, naive, clumsy and childish in the midst of a bunch of shrewd, ugly, lonely, conniving men.

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Of Mice and Men Chapter 2: Summary & Quotes

of mice and men chapter 2 analysis

GradeSaver, 30 November 2008 Web. Candy overhears George telling Lennie that he is glad they are not actually related. George and Lennie enter and first encounter Candy, who provides some description of the ranch, including a reference to the African-American named Crooks. This chapter begins with George and Lennie being shown around the bunk house by an old swamper named Candy. When Slim enters, she leaves. Ever since the girl in weed George is always thinking how their actions could backfire and someone could lie and get them canned.


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Of Mice and Men Chapter Two Summary and Analysis

of mice and men chapter 2 analysis

Curley enters again and confronts George, asking if his wife has been around. George admits that she was at the bunk house. However, the walk is much longer than they anticipated. She is provocatively dressed and quite flirtatious. Keep these details in mind as we continue. As they walk along, Lennie comes upon a pool of water and drinks thirstily; George warns him that the water might be bad as it has been stagnant in the sun, but Lennie pays him no heed. The boss then enters the room and begins interviewing George and Lennie.

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